Announcing MQR’s Open Call for Bloggers

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UPDATE: DUE TO THE HIGH VOLUME OF APPLICATIONS, SUBMISSIONS ARE NOW CLOSED. THANK YOU FOR APPLYING! WE LOOK FORWARD TO READING YOUR WORK.

 

Each spring, MQR welcomes applications for new blog contributors. We’re looking for writers with backgrounds in various disciplines to create unique, thought-provoking posts of interest to MQR’s online readership. Love to interview authors? Review books? Talk about the craft of writing or storytelling as it relates to some other discipline? Maybe you’ve got a great idea for a regular comic about the writing life—point is, we’re open to your pitches. Here is a list of DOs to review before preparing your application:

DO have stellar writing and proofreading skills.

DO have a wealth of ideas—and keep in mind that you’re not married to a single area of interest. If, for example, you’re primarily interested in interviewing emerging poets, but you’ve got to tell this incredible story of something that happened to you at a writing conference—that is certainly okay.

DO be dependable. We’ll be asking you to contribute one blog post per month (for one calendar year) so you’ve got to be able to produce.

DO have a presence on social media, whether it’s on Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr, etc. We’re interested in social media savvy writers who have the ability to help push their writing into the world.

Application Guidelines

In the body of your email, please include the following info:

  • Your name, email, and resident location.
  • A brief summary of your writing experience.
  • Your area(s) of interest and expertise.
  • How you propose to create or fill a niche on the MQR blog.
  • A short list of topics for the coming months in the vein of that niche.
  • Optional: links to your Twitter account, personal blog, website, etc.

Please also include a writing sample of 500-1500 words OR provide a link to a place where your writing may currently be read online.

Email applications to Rachel Farrell, Blog & Social Media Editor, at michiganquarterly@gmail.com. Please use the subject line “MQR Blog Application.”

The deadline for applications is Wednesday, April 22nd. We look forward to hearing from you!

FAQ

Q: How many posts do bloggers contribute? Can I submit posts when I feel like it and/or when I am inspired?

A: You must commit to delivering one post per month, according to an established schedule. We set up deadlines on Fridays (1st Friday, 2nd Friday, etc.).

Q: I’m a Luddite. Will someone prepare my posts for publishing?

A: You must be tech savvy enough to navigate a WordPress blog publishing environment, though of course you’ll receive some light training in how to use it. We’ll provide you with a Contributor Guide and you’ll be expected to rely on it as your go-to resource for business-as-usual questions. In the case of unusual issues you’ll email the blog editor for trouble-shooting and resolution. (A word of encouragement: WordPress is fairly user-friendly and most people pick it up without trouble.)

Q: I want to write about something the MQR blog is already (kind of) covering. Is this okay?

A: Probably, yes, and here’s why: while some of our current bloggers will go on contributing, many are preparing to run their final pieces on our site.

Q: I want to write about something the MQR blog has never covered and/or I have an idea for a funny/unorthodox regular feature. Is this okay?

A: The only way to know is to ask. Send us your pitch and we’ll see. We love to see different kinds of writing on the blog—not everything has to be Serious Commentary on Literature. When it comes down to it, we’re a blog dedicated to arts and culture, which is a pretty large umbrella.

Q: Is this a paying gig?

A: Yes, we pay $30 per blog entry.

Q: When will I hear from you?

A: If your application looks promising, we’ll be in touch by the end of May.

Q: How can I keep up with MQR online?

A: In addition to our website, you can find MQR on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest, and Tumblr.

 

Image: Bracquemond, Félix (1833-1914). Sketchbook with manuscript notes. Pencil, pen, ink, and watercolor, circa 1868-74. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles.

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