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On “Poetry Comics From the Book of Hours”: An Interview with Bianca Stone

“The process of making a poetry comic is vital, since I don’t plan out in advance; don’t plot and storyboard. The process is where the piece determines itself. It’s a lot like composing a poem on a blank page: you have tools (language, memories, obsessions, sound) and you work with those in a sort of simultaneous process of improvisation and intent. So, even if the poem is already written, it’s going to become something totally different in the end.”

Gustave Doré & Skewed Perspective

* Jeremy Allan Hawkins *

During his lifetime, a gallery was dedicated to Gustave Doré’s work in London, he was photographed by the one and only Nadar, and when he died at the age of 51, he was interred in Paris’s famous Cimetière du Père Lachaise. To posterity, one expert claims he left over one hundred thousand individual works, while even a conservative estimate puts it at over eleven thousand. That body of work has, in turn, been responsible for influencing countless illustrators—perhaps even inspiring our earliest comic books—and establishing visual tropes that still appear today in print and cinematic forms. There is no question that Doré sought to establish his legacy with a singular determination, and he succeeded in many ways, yet his greatest work may also be his most significant failure.

Gustave Doré & Skewed Perspective

* Jeremy Allan Hawkins *

During his lifetime, a gallery was dedicated to Gustave Doré’s work in London, he was photographed by the one and only Nadar, and when he died at the age of 51, he was interred in Paris’s famous Cimetière du Père Lachaise. To posterity, one expert claims he left over one hundred thousand individual works, while even a conservative estimate puts it at over eleven thousand. That body of work has, in turn, been responsible for influencing countless illustrators—perhaps even inspiring our earliest comic books—and establishing visual tropes that still appear today in print and cinematic forms. There is no question that Doré sought to establish his legacy with a singular determination, and he succeeded in many ways, yet his greatest work may also be his most significant failure.

An Imagined, and Imaginative, Feast

by Ann Marie Thornburg

when I recently discovered the blog 50 Watts, I felt a jolt of excitement. The website is an exhaustive collection of book-related art and design. For someone who loves to think about the minds-eye landscapes of writers, and who also loves to get lost in the beautiful, wacky, colorful and inventive work of visual artists, this blog, curated by Will Schofield, is the ultimate feast. It is a lovely reminder of how the written and visual can work together. Neither plays a mere supporting role. Instead, each medium nourishes the other in a meaningful kind of give-and-take. I encourage you to visit 50 Watts and see which pieces tempt you the most!