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Category Archives: From the Print Journal

Adonis

ADONIS COMES TO MICHIGAN

introduction by Khaled Mattawa

The poems “War” and “Ruins” are from Adonis’s latest book, Warraq Yabi‘u Kuttub al-Nujum (Printer of the Planets’ Books). Largely composed of leisurely prose meditations interspersed with lyrical flashes, the book draws on the poet’s memories, especially his childhood in Qassabin, Syria. Adonis adroitly recaptures a child’s sense of wonder, as well as a child’s anguish and fears. The books seems also a tribute to the villagers of Qassabin, to a dignity that seems to emerge from a naturally philosophical outlook and a practical resourcefulness that compliment each other. Tender and poised, the poems never veer into nostalgia or sentimentality. Perhaps the counterweight to Qassabin are the poems from a sequence titled “Dictionary” including the two poems presented here, where the dictionary serves as a context for the poet’s memories and provides a premonition of future violence and destruction.
(photo by Shadi Enbashi | juxtapoza.com)

Marshall_fig_1, Marshall_fig_2, Illustration by Megan Eckman

IN WHICH A COFFIN IS A BED BUT AN OX IS NOT A COFFIN

fiction by Brenda K. Marshall

The winter of 1881 found Frances Bingham reluctantly arrang­ing for her move from the spacious comfort of her father­-in­-law’s bonanza farm on the Dakota prairie to her almost­ com­pleted new home six miles away in Fargo. The arrangement that had suited both Percy and Frances since she had joined him in Dakota three years earlier—in which Percy insisted that he would soon leave his job as a newspaperman for the Fargo Argus to make a new start back east, and Frances, in turn, rea­soned that it made no sense for her and their son, Houghton, to move to Percy’s two rooms above the Argus in the meantime—had come to an end with Percy’s newfound respectability as Fargo’s delegate to the upcoming Fifteenth General Assembly of Dakota Territory. A man with a promising political career, Percy now insisted, must have his own home in Fargo, and his wife must live in that home with him, and not with his sister and father-­in­-law nearby.