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Category Archives: MQR Online

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On the Read Again

I love being read to. I also love reading aloud. I relish the permutation of reading that is shared. And, in my experience, the opportunity for shared reading tends to crop up in delightful and unexpected ways when I’m on the road.

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Tour blog!

by Lily Brown

Next week, I’m embarking on one of two little first-book tours, and I’ll be blogging about those tours here. The first tour is in California, and I’ll be doing readings at Pomona College, at University of California Merced, in San Francisco, and in Santa Cruz. The second tour will include stops in Richmond, Raleigh, Philadelphia, New York City, Providence, and Northampton. More on that tour in a future post. I’ve never blogged before, and I’m nervous because I have this idea that blogs have to be funny, and I don’t think of myself as being funny, at least not on purpose. I told this to my friend Claire Becker—who I’ll be on tour with in California—and she told me she would trade me funniness for beer on tour. I took her up on her offer.

Narrative Possibility & the Broadly Real

by Ashley David

Some years back, in the fall-out from the dot.com bubble-burst and the death of my grandmother, I sold my suits in a yard sale and took off for Mexico, where I spent six months immersing myself in a broader spectrum of reality than is customary in the U.S. and immersing myself in places where this reality is a given. My days and nights were populated by both the living and the dead, and nobody thought that was weird. I spent a night, for example, in a hacienda that was so haunted from the days of the Mexican Revolution that eight of us, all adults, climbed into the same (big) bed for the night. Given that a man, hanged during the Revolution, was still dangling from the rafters in the corner, we hoped to rest easier together. None of us could see him, but we didn’t doubt that he was among us. The man’s presence was legend and had been confirmed by a friend’s five year old on a prior visit. The child had asked his mother, without a note of fear in his voice, “Mommy, why is the man in purple swinging in the corner?”

Narrative Possibility & the Broadly Real

by Ashley David

Some years back, in the fall-out from the dot.com bubble-burst and the death of my grandmother, I sold my suits in a yard sale and took off for Mexico, where I spent six months immersing myself in a broader spectrum of reality than is customary in the U.S. and immersing myself in places where this reality is a given. My days and nights were populated by both the living and the dead, and nobody thought that was weird. I spent a night, for example, in a hacienda that was so haunted from the days of the Mexican Revolution that eight of us, all adults, climbed into the same (big) bed for the night. Given that a man, hanged during the Revolution, was still dangling from the rafters in the corner, we hoped to rest easier together. None of us could see him, but we didn’t doubt that he was among us. The man’s presence was legend and had been confirmed by a friend’s five year old on a prior visit. The child had asked his mother, without a note of fear in his voice, “Mommy, why is the man in purple swinging in the corner?”

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Brand New Car? BP Bought You That. Got You a Rolex? BP Bought You That.

by Nik de Dominic

I teach developmental composition in the Westbank of New Orleans, over the bridge from my home. If you were to keep on driving out there, away from New Orleans, you would be in the area on the map that looks like it’s breaking apart into the sea. If you followed any of the spill (spill always feels like the wrong word, let’s call it THE FUCKING EARTH HEMMORAGE) that occurred recently, you’re familiar with some of these areas: Plaquemines Parish, Lafitte, Barataria. I’m from California; I ride my bike most days; my father was an artist; and my mother was responsible for negotiating minority contracts for the City of Los Angeles during the 80s. It’s easy to say that if I lean, I fall over left. For me, indentifying the enemy here is easy – oil.