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Monthly Archives: February 2012

MQR @ AWP 2012

by Ashley David

And… we’re off. To Chicago. Along with at least 9300 of our dearest friends aka readers and writers. As you know if you’ve been, and you suspect even if you haven’t, AWP can be overwhelming, the kind of extravaganza that feels like it should feel like home but doesn’t quite. After all, most of us who will be there spend a great deal of time alone, and then, once a year, we squeeze ourselves into “extrovert-in-hyperdrive” mode. The maneuver is not unlike wearing spandex. Only a few look and feel truly fabulous, and it can be a cocktail for well, cocktails. But, it’s also amazing.

“The King of Hispaniola,” by Chidelia Edochie

fiction by Chidelia Edochie

I spent that Christmas Eve with my schoolmate Bibi and her parents at the National Palace, comparing the sizes of presents and our thirteen-year-old breasts with the other daughters of cabinet members and businessmen. All over Port-au-Prince younger children were taking off their shoes and filling them with hay so that Papa Noël could lade them with gifts as they slept. In the palace chandeliers gleamed down on us, everyone so drunk off of anisette punch that the whole place smelled of sugar and rum and salt from their sweat.

Bibi’s father, Mr. Mesadieu, kept an arm around President Duvalier as if they were brothers. The whole country called him Baby Doc—not fondly—and I’d heard Mr. Mesadieu refer to him as le bébé idiot. Our textbooks said that the Duvalier family had been the savior of Haiti, though our teacher often let it slip that he found the extravagance of their lifestyle distasteful. But I knew that Bibi liked him.

Winter 2012

Julian Levinson translates and comments on Moshe-Leyb Halpern, Derek Mong considers English as a second language, Natania Rosenfeld muses on her mother-in-law and Louise Bourgeois, Stefanie Weisman goes in search of E. B. White

Fiction by Alan Cheuse (with help – a lot of help – from Herman Melville), Bernardine Connelly, Chidalia Edochie, Peter Levine

Poetry by Nicolas Born, Victoria Chang, Moshe-Leyb Halpern, A. Van Jordan, Nick Lantz, Margaret Reges, Brian Swann, Ann Marie Thornburg

A review by Raymond McDaniel of Maggie Nelson’s The Art of Cruelty: A Reckoning

To Every Dish, There is a Season

by Monique Daviau

Plates and bowls are meant to be simple conveyances for food, but now eating at home would possess the burden of memory: each grown-up, lonely dinner of spaghetti with jarred sauce and salad from a bag would be served on plates that screamed in my face COLLEGE! YOUTH! 1998! NORTHAMPTON! NEVER EATING ALONE! Over time, would these thirty-six pieces of cracked, used china simply become my regular old dishes, no longer returning to my mind an amalgam of dusty, distant college memories? Did I want my Madeleine or didn’t I?

The First Peoples Initiative, “la India Bonita,” and a Few Good Reasons to Decry the Hipster Headdress: An Interview with Natasha Varner

“I’ve heard a lot of people defend the hipster headdress saying that it’s the same thing as wearing a crown or eating a pizza–that borrowing from and imitating other cultures is part of human nature. However, when you look at the history of genocide and other atrocities that Native Americans have experienced because of white settler colonists, the practice of appropriating their religious and cultural practices suddenly seems much more atrocious.”